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Daily Processing



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bragot

Posted: Sep 25, 2009
Score: 1



@proximo

Great input. The only area where we differ is on checking email frequently. I believe that email should only be checked about 4-5 times a day at most. Anything more than that is counter-productive IMO. I'm not saying I don't do this at time, but I find that I get more important things done when I check email.

Question for you though, how do you implement the energy level in toodledo? Is it a context? Would you then need to use 2 contexts for @work, @high-energy?
Proximo

Posted: Sep 28, 2009
Score: 1



Posted by bragot:
@proximo

Great input. The only area where we differ is on checking email frequently. I believe that email should only be checked about 4-5 times a day at most. Anything more than that is counter-productive IMO. I'm not saying I don't do this at time, but I find that I get more important things done when I check email.

Question for you though, how do you implement the energy level in toodledo? Is it a context? Would you then need to use 2 contexts for @work, @high-energy?


First I would like to say that I do agree with you on the email checking. If you check it too often it can be counter-productive. Unfortunately in my line of work it's required. I get some emails that must be acted on as soon as they arrive. I have a good balance with this and turn off the automatic notifications from my email program, but I still have to check email more often than I would like if it was up to me alone.

In either case, I manage to keep my email count to 10 or less. In many cases, I only have 2 to 3 emails at a time. I process quickly and trust my system to the point where I can check email and stay productive.

Energy:

I was using Tag's for energy, but I just recently started using tags for context. If you look at my GTD Setup thread, you will see that my actual Context in Toodledo are areas of focus and now I use Tags for Context. It sound confusing but it's really not.

Context are both location and resource. I use the main Context list for my location and Tags for resource based context such as @Phone, @Errand, etc.

With that said. I started to experiment with adding a (-) at the end of a task title for low energy task and (+) for high energy task.

Not sure if I will stick with this at this point, but it works.
Lucky FLIP

Posted: Sep 28, 2009
Score: 1



The energy differentiation (high vs. low) is a very interesting concept. Can you tell me how distinguishing a task between high energy and low energy has any value?
Proximo

Posted: Sep 28, 2009
Score: 2



Posted by Lucky FLIP:
The energy differentiation (high vs. low) is a very interesting concept. Can you tell me how distinguishing a task between high energy and low energy has any value?


This is just my opinion only.

Let me lay some ground work first.

The problem with a standard todo list with Priorities is that the low priority task will almost always stay at the bottom and never get done.

When you have new task coming in constantly that are higher in priority than many of the existing task on your todo list, you usually focus on the higher priority task. This becomes a problem because many of the low priority task never get done since they are constantly pushed to the bottom of the list by new incoming task.

The great thing about GTD is that I don't use hard priorities to label my task. I already decided they are all important enough that I must do them as soon as possible.

So how do you determine what you will work on. Using your Context, Time, Energy and Priority. The difference with GTD is that priorities are understood but not hard coded into your individual task.

When you do a weekly review or a mini review during the week, you are deciding what task you will do Next based on the....

1. Context
- Location or Resource at hand

2. Time
- How long does it take to complete the task vs. the time I have available

3. Energy
- Is the task something that requires high mental energy or low mental energy.

4. Priority
- How critical is the particular task for you to complete

So now we have these guidelines on how we choose our task.

Let's now focus on Energy level.

Energy level is a great way to get things off your list based on your current physical and Mental Energy.

If I am mentally drained, understanding what task require low mental energy can help me decide what to do next. I may have plenty of Time and resources but if I simply don't have the physical or mental energy to tackle some of these task. I can use the Low Energy level as an indicator on what to do next in my current state.

For me it's right after lunch. I am usually tired, sleepy and it takes me some time to get my second wind. This is a great time to select task based on energy level and still get things done.

That low priority, low energy task that seemed less important than anything else, takes center stage now.

Even if I have higher priority task, I would not accomplish much with them in my current mental energy state. I would probably stare at my screen and get a headache. This is not getting things done. By working on the low energy task, I can get things done while brain dead.

If I have two high priority task to do but one of them uses low mental energy. I may choose the low energy task if I am feeling drained. I also my choose the high energy task because I am mentally sharp at the time and I want to take advantage of it. I call this The Zone.

So marking task with Energy is more related to the mental energy required for the actual task. Knowing this can aid you on choosing a task to do next.

Because many low priority task are usually associated with low mental energy. They don't get much attention in a traditional to do list, but in GTD. Using your energy level to your advantage will help you tackle your task from many different angles.

These small low energy task boost your motivation because you still get the sense of accomplishment. High priority task can also be low mental energy task, so using this works either way.

This is why Energy is a great tool of GTD but unfortunately, many don't use it.


This message was edited Sep 28, 2009.
Lucky FLIP

Posted: Sep 28, 2009
Score: 1



Understood! Much more information than I anticipated. You really should get paid for this advice bro. This is good material, and makes me realize some of the things I could improve on my day-to-day activities. Really, this type of information will get me that extra edge as far as "competition" around the workplace goes...or against other males for that matter! :)

You are officially my mentor for GTD Proximo!!!
Proximo

Posted: Sep 29, 2009
Score: -1



Posted by Lucky FLIP:
Understood! Much more information than I anticipated. You really should get paid for this advice bro. This is good material, and makes me realize some of the things I could improve on my day-to-day activities. Really, this type of information will get me that extra edge as far as "competition" around the workplace goes...or against other males for that matter! :)

You are officially my mentor for GTD Proximo!!!


Lucky FLIP,

It's my pleasure to help how I can. These forums are filled with great people and we all learn from each other.

Thanks
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