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Erik C Bugge

Posted: Dec 01, 2008





This message was edited Dec 01, 2008.
Erik C Bugge

Posted: Nov 28, 2008



Posted by Søren Bjarnøe:
Well, simply call them "Next 7 days" and "Next 30 days". IMO, this would make much more sense. To make it perfect, the tasks should show up as in the current naming convention - as an example: "This month" tasks should display all tasks with due date in June and "This week" should display asks within the actual week (from Monday -> Sunday).


I totally agree with the Dane(?)!! I nearly posted a bug-report due to the misunderstandig of these tabs, even aften using ToodleDo for some time now. Or it just might be me ... :-)
Erik C Bugge

Posted: Nov 28, 2008



I think the calendar is supposed to give you a overview of your tasks with due dates set, which is of cource nice. As it is said on the calendar page, you could also see this in Google Calendar if you prefer (but the iCal-connection doesn't work that well).

My main objection to the caledar view is that the completed tasks show up at the due date rather than the completed date. Clearly this must be a bug, Toodledo??

A little request: Show completed tasks on the completed date, and specify how many that were over due like this:
"X Tasks Completed On Time"
"Y Over Due Tasks Completed"

I also think the the completed tasks should be exported in an iCal-connection, but maybe a different one?


This message was edited Nov 28, 2008.
Erik C Bugge

Posted: Nov 13, 2008



Importance/due date of parent task automatically set by the most important/next upcomming due date of the subtasks
I love the parent and subtask functionality, because it removes the cluttering of my todo-list by hiding the smaller, manageable steps under the main task (yes, I nest subtasks)! This helps me keep an overall focus and not get burried in small, currently unimportant details all the time.

There is a major flaw in the way subtasks works, though (I think), as described in the documentation:
"When subtasks are nested, they will be hidden inside their parent task and will only be visible when you reveal them. This could cause you to forget about an important subtask."

I think of the parent task as mainly a container of different tasks/steps (subtasks) that needs to be completed in order to complete the whole assignment. These subtasks may have different due dates (and priorities), so in periods you may not need to pay attention to the "container" itself. But when a due date for a subtask is closing, you should pay attention to the (parent) task again - or more correctly; Toodledo should make sure you pay attention again by increasing the importance of the parent task accordingly (so it appears on the Hotlist again), regardless of the overall due date and priority of the parent task.

One possibility would be to explicitly set the parent task to "As subs" in order to achive this.


This message was edited Nov 13, 2008.
Erik C Bugge

Posted: Nov 11, 2008



I poste d a suggestion for integration of the timer and Paymo.biz (as one example).

This message was edited Nov 11, 2008.
Erik C Bugge

Posted: Nov 11, 2008



Arbitary time tracker through HTTP API request
It should be possible to log the timer entries in an external time tracker program through a simple HTTP API request, like the one for Paymo.biz.

The logic should be as follows:
* A request should be sent when stopping the timer (log the current job entry)
* If the duration is changed when the timer is running, the start time or end time should be adjusted accordingly:
** If duration is increased, you most likely forgot to start the timer, so adjust the start time
** If duration is decreased, you most likely forgot to stop the timer, so adjust the end time

Any possibility of this? It would save me (and many more?) loads of time of redundant registration.


This message was edited Nov 11, 2008.
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