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cesarabeid

Posted: Sep 17, 2011
From Topic: Cesar's GTD setup



Hello all!

I use Toodledo as part of my GTD setup and thought you'd like to see how I use it.

Check out the link below and leave me a note there if you can.

http://pmforthemasses.com/my-getting-things-done-setup/

Cheers!

Cesar
cesarabeid

Posted: Feb 10, 2011



Nice, thanks. I think I'll take the plunge. :)

Cesar
http://pmforthemasses.com
cesarabeid

Posted: Feb 09, 2011



Salgud,

Yes, there is a lot of people who like it, and I can see how it could be useful when repeating a project.

Even if I don't use the subtask feature, I still might consider upgrading TD because of the file management feature. I read on the forums here that if you forward an email to TD (and you have a Pro subscription) it'll save the body of the email AND the attachments.

Can anybody confirm this?

Thanks,

Cesar
http://pmforthemasses.com
cesarabeid

Posted: Feb 08, 2011
From Topic: due dates



Greg,

This is a very good question. This is where GTD starts merging with real project management.

You are actually thinking of a gantt chart, in which tasks have predecessors and successors. When creating a project schedule, or a gantt chart, you need to estimate durations for tasks and how they relate to each other. If you have a hard-landscape milestone or project completion date, you work your schedule back from that date.

Check this out for information on project schedules:

http://pmforthemasses.com/the-project-schedule/

This is a bit beyond the scope of GTD. GTD basically worries about the "next action" and assumes you'll keep assigning "next actions" as you complete the current ones.

I tend to quickly estimate how long this or that task will take and assign due dates for them. In a way, when you do that, they are not really soft due dates as you described them. They are actually "hard" due dates, since if you don't complete them in that sequence and in that time-frame, your project will fail.

As David Allen explains it, you should do the thinking up front, so you can get the issue out of your mind.

Sometimes the thinking will require you to set dates for tasks.

Cesar
http://pmforthemasses.com
cesarabeid

Posted: Feb 08, 2011



Interesting implementation, Chris.

I toyed with the idea of going TD Pro so I could try the subtasks feature. From what I see, people generally don't like it, and as Derek-User1, I'm afraid my iPhone client won't support it (I use Pocket Informant).

Cesar
http://pmforthemasses.com
cesarabeid

Posted: Feb 08, 2011
From Topic: Only 1 context



If all of your work is done at the computer, then setting "Computer" as a context really serves no purpose. It would be like having a context called "Earth." Or filing all your reference material under "P" for "paper."

The idea of a context is for you to easily access a list of tasks that can be done once you find yourself in that context. For example, I have a context called "driving," in which I have tasks to be performed when I'm out on the road. For example: deposit a check, or buy windshield washer fluid.

So it's not really the best idea to have a context called "Excel" in my opinion. It is not like you are going to find yourself at Excel, and then pull out a list of things to do while you're there.

If all you do is in the same context, perhaps you don't need the concept of contexts in your system. My feeling though is that you have other things in your life that are not done at the computer (unless you are physically bound to it). That's when contexts shine: as you move about your day, you find yourself here and there, and having a list of tasks that can be done here or there allows you to be productive all the time, while having everything off your mind.

I hope that helps!

Cesar
http://pmforthemasses.com
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