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jpv2112-s

Score: 0
I've been a long-time paid Toodledo user. However, I found that while TD is excellent for combining tasks from disparate projects and allowing for a "Getting Things Done" approach to seeing one's tasks for the day/context, there's no TD tool for proper project planning and project maintenance.

Perhaps GTD was never about the goal/project creation process, but rather cutting through the common busywork of modern life.

For me, a goal/project creation tool would look like a notebook with additional tools to help transition from the long term "what, why, etc." to yearly through daily milestones along with tracking, time requirements, etc. Perhaps Gantt charts too. Currently, I use Evernote and TD, but TD is really just a database/spreadsheet of tasks that can be filtered/sorted in most any way. Powerful, but not all that's necessary for goal/project maintenance and updating.

Are there goal/project creation and maintenance tools that others like?
jpv2112-s

Posted Jan 15, 2020 in: Toodledo not working with IPV6?
Score: 0
My Verizon hotspot has been giving me an IPV6 number in recent days and I've noticed several sites not working over IPV6 including Toodledo. I suspect that the trouble is somewhere in the AJAX/web-app interfaces as the initial page loads fine (just the async stuff does not load). If I force IPV4 through a VPN, all works fine again for Toodledo and other sites.

Just FYI as the IPV6-geddon is coming, especially with the IOT boom.
jpv2112-s

Score: 1
Hello,

Something recently changed in the Android app UX where I often get new "untitled tasks" being added to my list-- a task with all default values. I suspect that when I check-off a task on the Android app and then close the app, it creates a "new" task without my intent and syncs with the mothership?

Is anyone else noticing this?
jpv2112-s

Posted Feb 15, 2017 in: Optional Due Date
Score: 0
same here, stopped working today.
jpv2112-s

Posted Nov 10, 2015 in: Habits Feature?
Score: 0
Has anyone had success using the habits feature in TD?

I've tried it for a week as a way to remind myself to change in the directions that I want to go (without cluttering up the task list with daily repeats), but to me it's essentially a less convenient daily reminder list insofar as I'd have to click to another screen. Perhaps habit reminders would be better put the task area as a single task with either subtasks or reminders in the note of the task. I'm personally not inspired or motivated by a chain-link representation of the past successes/failures, and recognize that the point of goal planning is to change present and future behavior/results, not dwell on the past. Therefore, for me, a simple reminder list of daily habits is sufficient to keep my ever-changing personal development goals in focus.

Additionally, there are a few glaring omissions/errors which lead me to believe that the product is perhaps on it's way out? First, if you click on a star to log an item (maybe accidentally), there's no way to delete it and make it un-logged again (important, because the habits metrics focus on whether something was logged or not). Secondly, the graph for the number-logged habits extends off the bottom of my Windows Chrome screen (other habit measurement types don't do this).

Has anyone found the habits feature useful?
jpv2112-s

Score: 0
If you could be more specific, I think people could answer your question.

TD offers a wizard where you tell it how many hours you have available and it looks for your tasks' "length" field to add them up to that amount. Beyond that, you're just going to have to think on paper and decide when to brush your teeth.
jpv2112-s

Score: 0
Thank you for taking the time to reply.

Do you find that the mind-mapping method is much better than using a word-processor outline? I could see it being more visual, but at the same time not allowing much in the way of text notes.

Also, if you have many tasks in TD from different projects/goals, do you preface the subject line with the task to help identify what project they belong to? I've been using the TD "goal" field for identifying the tasks' projects, but tags sounds like a good option too. The advantage of using the "goal" field is that it's exclusive (task can only belong to one project).

After doing some research, Evernote's IFTTT options seem to have recently been stripped to just one trigger: send notes that have been publicly shared to whatever service that IFTTT uses. Google's history reveals that there was likely some other triggers in the past (e.g., checkbox line items can be shared). In any case, it seems like any Evernote->TD integration is going to be manual without using another subscription service like taskclone. Has anyone any reviews after using taskclone?

A task that is part of any complex project is to review/plan/revise the very same project. It's likely that that planning will not be done all at once before the beginning, and likely that the plan will keep changing as the project progresses. So it would be best to have more planning flexibility inside TD. Alternatively, I think I'll just have to keep updating the TD tasks manually when my Evernote planning sessions cause a change in the tasks, their priority, etc. This is unlike your scenario where the tasks are dumped in one-time at the beginning, which would much easier.
jpv2112-s

Score: 0
Hello,

AFAIK, there's no good way to plan out a project in Toodledo and those of us with more complex planning needs simply have to use an alternative text tool like Evernote, and copy tasks from there to TD to use TD's line-item sorting/filter tools (context, due date, etc.).

By project planning, I mean making an outline showing/listing all the tasks and sub tasks and sub-sub tasks, etc. Also, a project plan would be a place to store notes about that project. I know TD has "notes" and "outlines" but those are odd rudimentary appendages that aren't very useful (they aren't searchable, or categorizable, etc.).

I was considering using the TD "goal" field (per project), but there's no way to sort the goals inside a goal view that one would normally need to order the tasks based on what needs to be done first. I know there are due-dates, but arbitrarily adding-in due-dates ruins the whole system--due dates should only be used for hard deadlines. The TD sub-task feature is only 1 sub-level -- not very useful in most cases.

As an aside, I know TD doesn't have this, but in reality, projects have dependencies where one task cannot be worked on until a previous task is complete. It would certainly be nice is to be able to see what I can work on today as opposed to what items will need to be worked on in the future but cannot be worked on today because of a dependency. Perhaps someone has kludged a way to see dependencies using existing TD options? I know I can change the STATUS field to "waiting," but upon checking off a task, I wouldn't automatically know which dependent tasks to change from "waiting" to "next action" without manually tracking the dependent tasks in the notes or something.

Assuming my premises are correct, project plans/notes are best kept outside of TD. Does anyone have any tips for keeping both the project plans and TD task lists synchronized efficiently? I know I can constantly and manually cut/paste/update from one tool to the other, but perhaps this process can be made more automated or at least routine/habitual with the help, say, of saved searches?

In general, I value being able to quickly see what's due and what I can work on today based on context/time/energy among all projects, but know that all but the simplest tasks should be planned out to create the doable tasks that go in to the TD database. Also, just to save time in this discussion, I'm not interested in MS Project since all but the enterprise-level projects can be planned using a simple outline-capable tool like Evernote or any word-processing program.
jpv2112-s

Posted Sep 26, 2015 in: How to Track Larger Tasks
Score: 0
Thanks for the additional suggestions. I've used Project in various positions over the years and agree that it's more cost and maintenance than I'd want, in addition to not being portable. I want need Gantt charts per se, just an indicator of how full the days are based on due dates and task lengths (or at least whether there's not enough time to complete a 80 hour task in 2 days).

I believe our lists should be as small as possible: just things that must be done (based on due dates), and then other items that we want to work on (priorities, context, etc.) Therefore, I still don't see the point of using start dates save indicating that a task cannot be started until a certain date (e.g., tax returns usually cannot be started before 1/1, but are due 4/15). So start dates are not conceptually very useful (but many here are using them as a hack to see what larger tasks should be worked on since larger tasks are lost in TD's available sortings).

I'll keep thinking about it, but thanks for the suggestions.
jpv2112-s

Posted Sep 19, 2015 in: How to Track Larger Tasks
Score: 1
Thanks for the replies and spending the time to write down your tips.

My main disappointment at this point is how TD had great promise years ago but has for the most part been neglected.

I realize now that my attempt to use TD "goals" was a bit of a waste of time since they (still) cannot be used/searched hierarchically. TD Folders doesn't seem like a good solution because they too are not hierarchical--they're just another "custom" flat field to be used as desired.

Just about all the available TD tools are quirky and "almost" usable for goal-planning, but ultimately not much more useful than a vanilla database. The fields have the interesting names like "length" and "start-date" and "goals" which lure you in to putting data in to them, but they don't do much more than record simple data (i.e., sort/search by length, or start-date). Why not at least offer to calculate the due dates and lengths and warn the user that there's not enough time? TD is more powerful than most to-do list manager products but I think it would be better to offer the user a blank set of database fields and let the users decide how to track their tasks--perhaps offering templates to start.

Generally, there's no automated way inside TD to plan a project and send actionable line-items to the schedule/task tracker. In TD, one can create a "goal" or folder for a project, but then there's no page to plan that task--just the ability to create tasks and assign them that goal/folder. Unless you're a genius or the project is dead-simple, no one can simply list the tasks that need to be done without thinking on paper or having a place to record project notes.

Therefore, I do most all of my planning and strategizing in Evernote (it has outlines, tags, and even checkboxes), and TD has for the most part become for me a simple recurring to-do list to remind me to check the oil on my vehicles from time to time. Any project scheduling is done manually by cut-n-pasting tasks in to TD from another separate tool like Evernote.


Back to my original desire of tracking larger tasks:

Of course, we all need to manage our lists/tasks and often manually. If we have a large task due in 5 weeks that takes 3 weeks to complete, we should start this week. I'm just hoping for a tool that will let me know that I'm overloaded next week and should not commit to something I cannot deliver on. TD is most definitely not that tool (and neither is anything else AFAIK).

To me, start-dates are not all that useful except to indicate that one CANNOT start something early. I assume we all operate first from due-dates, then priorities, then fill-in where the traditional GTD contexts & available time allow. I try to never assign due-dates to anything unless I've made a commitment to someone to deliver by then. (I'm sure people have different opinions about assigning due-dates to one's personal goals, but for me it's arbitrary pressure, and I try to work from my priorities as much as possible.)

Many replies suggest making several TD searches to see different goals. For me, that's a net loss of efficiency because for me the purpose of using a tool like TD is to see one list or view that tells me what I need to do so as not to miss any due-dates (and hopefully more about whether I'm able to commit to new tasks and projects). Having to remember to flip through several lists is to me a failure of the system--I could just as easily flip through all my Evernote project journals (which can be organized in much the same way as TD).

However, I can see value and do use separate searches for context-based tasks (e.g., phone-calls, or anything under 20 minutes).

Anyway, thanks again for the suggestions. I'll have to spend more time thinking about how to make the available tools useful to standard goal planning and task tracking.
jpv2112-s

Posted Sep 17, 2015 in: How to Track Larger Tasks
Score: 1
Thanks for the replies.

It sounds like there's no method without having to "manually" create and reload extra lists in various views and constantly look for the "gotchas" out there, such as tasks that should be started earlier than the single metric due date would normally indicate.


Begin rant:

I would think the usefulness of TD to most people is to offload one's mind of all the responsibilities and be able to focus on one thing at a time (ala GTD). Ideally, we could write in all the tasks in to the TD database and RELY on it to remind us what we should be doing today in one list/glance/page. The "holy grail" would be a tool that we could dump in our plans, responsibilities, available time, etc., and have TD show us what we can reasonably accomplish with our limited time and resources, which items are in danger of not getting done, what we should be working on today, this week, this month, etc.

With the current system, there are too many work-arounds and extra effort needed to manage TD that often renders it a net time-suck rather than a productivity booster, or at least makes it marginally more useful than more popular services like Evernote. Most people here already know how to make list in a Google docs spreadsheet and sort it by "priority" or "due date" or whatever we choose to add to the spreadsheet, so TD must be fundamentally better than this free and easy method of creating lists.

I would think if TD wants to remain competitive with the many alternatives, I would hope they would keep working toward making it an intuitive time-saving productivity tool as a top priority. Over the years, most of the TD development has been in fringe areas (lists, outlines, habits, visuals, etc.).

GTD is working on a major cloud service for implementing their system, and unless TD stays true to it's original purpose, it'll be quickly forgotten when the GTD service is released.

As an example of the lack of attention to improving the core to-do list management, after years of TD development, we still cannot make a saved search for a parent goal and have the child goals appear (i.e., no way to actually use the potentially useful hierarchical goal structure). We still have to spend a lot of time finessing our real-life plans and tasks to fit in to the limited TD database fields and hope that the "importance" algorithm does what WE want it to do, and hope that no balls get dropped. The new TD features like lists and outlines (perhaps conceived to be a project planning tool?) are bizarrely divorced from task-management making them a useless appendage and a waste of development time, in my opinion (the mobile apps have been a good use of time, in my opinion).

I understand the context that TD is a company with limited development resources, implementing changes to a live working database is very complex, and changing established behaviors/lists for us paying customers would be potentially disruptive. However, I feel that the new features that TD has spent their development time on in the past few years are not very useful especially compared to leaving the core to-do list product to wane.

AFAIK, TD remains the best tool for to-do list management but it's far from perfect. TD has always been a poor to mediocre tool for the sister task of project planning. (I would think people who want a to-do list manager would also be looking for project planning tools.) I hope TD refocuses on their original core product, but I know that other companies are spending time to create better to-do/project planning products, and given TD's trajectory, I don't think they'll soon be competitive with the other options.

If a TD employee is reading this, don't bother writing "these features are on our list, and we cannot comment on the timeline for implementing them." I'm just addressing the odd prioritization that TD leadership has chosen over the past 4 years.


This message was edited Sep 17, 2015.
jpv2112-s

Posted Sep 06, 2015 in: How to Track Larger Tasks
Score: 0
Has anyone figured out how to use TD to conveniently track larger projects/tasks that will require a lot of time to complete, and still show up in some kind of priority list based on time and due-date?

For example, you have a project due in 3 weeks, and you anticipate it will require 40 hours of work. The TD tools available would have this appear on the priority/importance/due-date lists as being due in 3 weeks (beneath smaller tasks that are due sooner), but most certainly, you cannot start working on it in 2.5 weeks. It would be nice to see this appear near the top of some list today based on the time-required and date due.

I've asked this a few years ago, but the available TD options weren't conducive at the time. Obviously, productive people would spend the time to convert such a large project in to smaller manageable tasks before digging in, but in the very beginning, projects are often simply a due date and an estimated time-to-complete, so it would be good to be reminded that the project needs attention today based on its size and due date.

Any ideas?
jpv2112-s

Score: 0
Although lists/notes can be "attached" to a task, it's not the same as creating a list of items that need doing (I would think almost all list items are intended to be done at some point), assigning a due date and having that list item appear in the task area. I think there are enough existing options in Toodledo (e.g., goals, sub-goals) to group tasks in to lists that can be translated in to tasks, but not as convenient.
jpv2112-s

Score: 7
I'm not sure if this topic is planned or previously discussed, but I think that the essential value of Toodledo are the task management tools especially task aggregation, prioritization and sorting. However, at some point in the past few years, TD has chosen to add Notes, Outlines and Lists. I find that these new tools are not very useful because they don't integrate in to the Task list at all. The essence of us humans creating outlines/notes/lists is to do something with them at some point (or at least sort through all the things we want to do with our lives and choose the most valuable things that we have time for), and if there's no ability to integrate lists/notes/outlines in the main task list, they're just one more separate list/note/outline to keep track of.

I assume this is obvious to TD since they added a "buy a house" example to the outline section. Aren't all those outline items meant to be done at some point? How does one assign deadlines and integrate those house-buying tasks in with the rest of the ongoing projects we all have? Copy and paste?

Until these added features integrate in to the task lists, Evernote is a much better tool for lists, notes and outlines.
jpv2112-s

Score: 0
Seems all better now. Generally, from a UI perspective, a common down server shouldn't result in constant notification pop-ups.
jpv2112-s

Score: 1
Today I suddenly started getting "Toodledo stopped working" pop-ups on two of my devices (1 Lollipop, and the other is the previous major release), repeating every 15 minutes or so. I reset one of the devices, but it didn't fix it. I run the Toodledo app, and it seems to work fine... but the messages keep popping up.
jpv2112-s

Score: 0
Hello,

Are there any convenient/eloquent strategies in Toodledo to see tasks that are due in the future (e.g., 2 weeks), but require a lot of time to complete them, and thus have them pop-out or appear near the top of the the current list (sorted by importance?) rather than a few days before they're do?

I can think of several ways around this (e.g., setting up an extra task to do 30-minutes of work on this task due today--repeating daily, etc.). However, I've never seen a goal-setting program that does this well.

Ideally, the sorting algorithm would increase the importance of a task that is say, 2 weeks out, but requires 30 hours of work.

I was hoping people could share their work-around strategies for being able to plan future time-consuming tasks and then not losing sight of them in the big list. Or perhaps point me to a Toodledo feature that does this well.
jpv2112-s

Posted Feb 22, 2014 in: Shortcut Keys: Either custom or Gmail
Score: 0
Hello,

It sure would be nice to be able to customize the shortcut keys or offer different standards (like Gmail). I frequently hit "c" to "c"ompose a new task.

Perhaps I'll look in to making a Greasemonkey script...

Does anyone else know of a workaround?
jpv2112-s

Score: 0
I understand.

Perhaps a quicker feature to implement would be to allow the custom search options for goals to search the goals' labels sub-strings? That would allow users to include some tag in the goals' labels that could be quickly picked-up by the custom-searches.

Right now, the only search option is "task is assigned a specific goal."
jpv2112-s

Score: 0
Hello,

In my web-development company, I have a lot of active jobs and have added them to the "short term goals" section and all these goals contribute to the lifelong goal of running a my successful business. Each short-term job/goal contains many tasks.

I would like to see all the tasks that contribute to the lifelong goal, however, the only goal-filter option I see in the search area only shows tasks assigned directly to a particular life-long goal, not an option to show all the task assigned to the short-term goals that "contribute to" the life-long goal.

Does anyone know of a way to achieve this?

If not, I would like to ask for a feature (if not already on the list) to add a query to grab all the task that "contribute to" a higher-level goal.

Also, if anyone has alternative ways to organize work jobs each with many tasks, I'd appreciate reading about your solutions.
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