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Toodledo is not for GTD



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TheGriff

Posted: Jun 03, 2009
Score: 0



Maybe the mods here could split the Evernote stuff into a new thread?

Big KC...I'm surprised you aren't using the Toodledo Firefox extension to get things into Toodledo. I use it all the time to capture web pages I want to check in on later.

I'm confused about the problems you have finding EN URLs. If you click on the note to open it you should be able to copy the link from the address bar. In fact I just tested the Firefox extension's ability to "Toodledo This Page" within an EN note and it worked flawlessly. I had to type in the "task" name but it filled in the EN url in the note field perfectly.
Anders

Posted: Jun 03, 2009
Score: 0



Posted by Big KC:
Anders, does the Paint for Evernote create an ink note that Evernote can recognize, like in the Evernote app on WM? I thought of buying it; but couldn't tell if it works that way.

It saves your notes as images, which evernote should make searchable, but for some reason I have not been successful searching for things in the text of notes I create on Paint for Evernote. Maybe my writing is too messy., I still think it's a great app. You can open it, jot a note, and have your note on EN, all very quickly.


This message was edited Jun 03, 2009.
Big KC

Posted: Jun 03, 2009
Score: 0



Posted by TheGriff:
Big KC...I'm surprised you aren't using the Toodledo Firefox extension to get things into Toodledo. I use it all the time to capture web pages I want to check in on later.

I do use the FF extension at times, if a web site gives me an idea for a specific action other than "Read this". If it's just an item to read it goes into my "Reading Pile" folder in Evernote, where I can easily read it, annotate it, and then file it to my general reference folders if I like it. I used to create Next Actions for items I want to read. But I re-read GTD earlier this year and saw that David Allen suggests just having a read/review stack, and using the items in the stack as the reminder. I tried it out using Evernote as my (digital) reading pile, and liked it. That's when I really started webclipping stuff to Evernote.

I find it helpful to create my project support folders in Evernote, too. If I'm making a big purchase, for example, I can clip reviews, photos, etc into the folder, add my own thoughts, and email the notes to my wife and mother-in-law for their opinions. (OK, I haven't done that yet...but I plan to. They always have sensible advice). I can even scan hardcopy stuff into Evernote quite easily, and it becomes searchable. I'm really bad at managing paper notes and hardcopy files.

Now that I've started using Evernote for my reading pile, general reference, and project folders, I find myself in there all the time. I've started using it to capture random thoughts as they come up. That's where all the different capturing techniques have really come in handy. In a recent article, David Allen wrote
One of the most valuable lessons I've learned in my quasi-scientific approach to sustained laziness is the value of storing thoughts in appropriate places, as soon as I have them. That means parking them where I will later evaluate their merit (or lack thereof) and dispose of them accordingly. Having a thought once is what the mind is for; having the same thought twice, in the same way, for the same reason, is a waste of time and energy. I also found out that having a place for good ideas produced more of them, and more often.
http://www.wired.co.uk/wired-magazine/archive/2009/05/how-to/be-creative-amid-chaos.aspx#
I've always felt the same way; but never implemented it consistently. Personally, I find myself capturing those thoughts much more often since I've had evernote. I'm really bad at managing paper notes.

As an aside, I just recently started using Evernote to catalog my favorite quotes--something I've always wanted to do. The first quote I saved was DA's description of GTD as his "quasi-scientific approach to sustained laziness". I love it.

I know all of this can be done using paper, etc. But did I mention that I'm bad at managing paper? Always have been. It's some sort of mental roadblock I have. I hate flipping through folders, sorting through handwritten notes, often recopying them, etc. That's probably an issue I need to work on. But in the meantime, Evernote helps me to function much better. :-)

Posted by TheGriff:
I'm confused about the problems you have finding EN URLs. If you click on the note to open it you should be able to copy the link from the address bar. In fact I just tested the Firefox extension's ability to "Toodledo This Page" within an EN note and it worked flawlessly. I had to type in the "task" name but it filled in the EN url in the note field perfectly.

I had tried copying the URL before, and it didn't work. Must've been user error, because it works now. Never thought of using the TD FF extension from within Evernote. Great idea! That solves my problem when I'm at my desktop, at least. (It still doesn't solve it from my mobile apps though. Evernote mobile apps allow you to email a note; but not a link to a note. Emailing the note to my TD email never works right. Anyone have any tips for this? I have all my best ideas when I'm out and about.)

I second your request for the mods to move the Evernote discussion to a new string.


This message was edited Jun 03, 2009.
Big KC

Posted: Jun 03, 2009
Score: 0



Posted by lite1:
Anders and Big KC thax for sharing/responding but perhaps you can elaborate or get more concrete as I am still missing the power of EN. I do not use TD in a mobile arena; I do have a Blackberry but rarely use it to take photos. I do a great deal of research online, primarily text oriented stuff, although a diagram or photo/graphic/image might also be part of it. Typically I have two web browser windows open (one for work related things for when a customer might call on the phone; the other for my web research) both with several tabs open with TD in one of those tabs.
I do most of my online work using my mobile tools...mostly my iPod Touch, with my WM phone as a backup. Even when I'm home, I don't use my desktop too much. The kids are always on it. That might be the critical difference.

My approach might be:
1) Article I wish to read later - type N to create a task Read ... cut/paste the url into note with some sense of why I think the article/info might be of value and to what. Done, onto next thing.

2) Read reviews to make a decision about purchase of new equipment: Depending on the importance and monetary expense I'd typically have a word doc open into which I'd cut and paste web items including screen captures. Read things in word doc so that I can both use highlighter and make my own annotations. Create task in TD to read/complete analysis and write report with recommendation to boss.

3) If my web based research is more extensive/elaborate and depending on its purpose and audience, my initial word doc might then become a PDF that I can work with in Acrobat Pro. WIth it not only can I highlight in different colors, but I can place collapsible notes as kind of a layer so that I can meta-comment on some aspect of the content. I haven't played much with EN, but not sure I could really do those things.

4) In learning TD, I cut/paste into word doc entire forum threads or portions thereof that I find to be useful tips of how people are using things. Again I don't see where EN would be an advantage.

Evernote might not create any advantage over your current process if you do most of your work in the same place. I've never used Acrobat Pro. Sounds like it does have more advanced annotating features. Evernote will allow you to change font colors for highlighting, but not collapsible annotations. The main advantage to me is that it's in the cloud, so I can access it from many places. The secondary advantage is its great capturing and recognition/searching features relative to other cloud-based options. (Have you ever tried to copy and paste on an iPhone or iPod Touch? LOL)

Big KC writes about capturing audio notes, and I guess this might be useful to me when I am driving.

When driving, or even when walking through the grocery store with my two-year-old tagging along. This is my least favorite capture technique, though, because Evernote can't transcribe the audio notes. I've been thinking of using dial2do or Jott or something so I can get the audio with a transcription into my evernote inbox. Haven't tried it yet, though.

But bottom line is that either I am missing the power of EN, OR perhaps since I am not wanting/needing to be productive in a mobile situation that EN is not necessarily a tool of value for me. I always have 3 x 5 cards with me (been carrying them for a couple of decades - not the same ones) and still find that writing something rather than typing because of the different kinesthetic input triggers different parts of my thinking.

[shudder] Did I mention I hate working with paper notes? Actually, I admire people who have that skill. I've read of people implementing GTD successfully with nothing but a stack of notecards and some paper clips to group them by context, etc. I've spent countless hours learning high-tech methods for doing what others do perfectly well with paper and pen. And the technology changes every couple of years, so I have to learn all over again. (Evernote and TD are both very new for me). I honestly see my dependence on high-tech as a character flaw. But a relatively minor one in the grand scheme of things.


The developer of EN refers to it as "your external brain" or something like that. My judgment, by it seems that some of the video clips on EN of people using it to remind them of where they parked seem slightly absurd to me - seems like using the memory that one has built in as a human OR some low tech solution like jotting it on a parking slip or 3x5 might work as well.
I thought so too, until I started using EN for other stuff and got in the habit of using it. Now I often find myself without paper and pen, so I end up using EN for some quite mundane things. Just last week I used it to write down my hotel room number. Turns out I didn't need it. I almost always remember my room number. But if I don't write it down I worry that I'll forget it. Evernote is overkill for that. I don't need my room number synced to the cloud...I could've just used my iPod notepad, which is just a digital 3x5 card. But I'm in the habit of going into EN now.


This message was edited Jun 03, 2009.
lite1

Posted: Jun 04, 2009
Score: 0



Posted by Big KC:
I do most of my online work using my mobile tools...mostly my iPod Touch, with my WM phone as a backup. Even when I'm home, I don't use my desktop too much. The kids are always on it. That might be the critical difference.

Evernote might not create any advantage over your current process if you do most of your work in the same place.

[shudder] Did I mention I hate working with paper notes? Actually, I admire people who have that skill. ... And the technology changes every couple of years, so I have to learn all over again. (Evernote and TD are both very new for me). I honestly see my dependence on high-tech as a character flaw. But a relatively minor one in the grand scheme of things.


Big KC thx for taking time to give me more insight into your use of EN. I'm somewhat tethered to my laptop that goes back and forth from home to work, yet is rarely used on batteries. When I'm not at computer, I do like to hike and when possible back pack, so while I understand - sort of - having data in the "cloud" I prefer to actually hike high enough to be in the clouds. So different life styles as you mention probably suggest the use of different approaches/technologies.

My only son is 25 and attached to the iPhone and synching to two computers. Learning new technology can be a chore and/or great mind stretch. My 1st laptop was Radio Shack model 100 (which I'll donate to a museum) and 1st emails went at speed of 300 baud, so over the years I've learned that investing in skill building of my brain/mind and balancing that with technology is my best strategy. Enjoy this forum as many including you seem to have a good grip on using what is between their ears.

Agree that the thread should be split - sorry to have pulled it so far off, yet appreciate good picture of your uses of EN. And I'll probably play with it as much as a tool as for my explorations into western cultural trends.
Edward
edit - P.S. In my era, post its were a high tech revolution in the paper and pencil world. I still find many uses for them. I can imagine you shuddering!


This message was edited Jun 04, 2009.
Big KC

Posted: Jun 04, 2009
Score: -1



LOL. I used a post-it once. It's still on my wall, right beside me, with a phone number I've long since memorized. I guess I should take it down. Seriously, how sad is that?
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